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Which vegetable team won the pop quiz

The cabbages of course, they have the best heads!

paddock-to-plate-children2

Drums and Bullets

In shops and markets around Australia, you can find bullet headed cabbages (sometimes called rocket cabbages – ka-boom!) and tight wadded purple and green cabbages all year around.

See if you can find a drum cabbage – they are the vast, solid, thumping great heads like a drum.

In the cooler months, look out for cabbage royalty, the Savoy cabbage with its ruffled leaves. This one is a super-star in French cooking, where cooks and chefs stuff it with pork and breadcrumbs and all sorts of wonderful things.

The recipe is loads of hands-on fun and easier than you would think. It’s 100% totally awesomely impressive.

Growing Tips

We hate to break it to you, but growing cabbages means vigilance and high security. Are you ready for it?
Cabbage moth, that sweet little white moth that flutters innocently lays eggs that hatch into green caterpillars. They eat holes in the leaves.

Security is the answer! Simply put a fine net over your cabbage patch and peg it down around the sides. The net prevents young Ms. Cabbage Moth from laying her eggs.

No eggs, no caterpillars, no holes.

The good news is that if you live in the cooler climate parts of Australia, cabbage moths hibernate for the winter. Get planting in autumn and she’ll be right.

Colour Shifter

In a glass bowl or jug, soak about a quarter of a chopped purple cabbage in a litre of boiling water (adult hands here please!) Leave until it is cool.

When it is cold, use a strainer over a bowl to separate the cold floppy cabbage from the bright purple water. Admire – what a great colour. Put the cabbage in the compost and keep the purple water.

Now the wizard wheeze! Take some small clear juice glasses or jars. In each glass put a tablespoon of something acidic or alkaline. Pour a bit of purple cabbage water into each glass. What happens?

• Acids: lemon juice, vinegar, fruit juice, tartaric acid.
• Alkaline: bicarbonate of soda, a crushed stomach anti-acid tablet.

Science Stuff

Purple cabbage is pH sensitive. This means it reacts to acid and alkaline substances. The colour changes as the unstable natural chemicals in the purple cabbage water react with the acid or alkaline substance. Acids go pink and red, neutrals stay in the blue-purple range and alkalines are green to yellow. Try testing several kitchen items.

child-1-paddock-to-plate

Which vegetable team won the pop quiz

paddock-to-plate-children2

The cabbages of course, they have the best heads!

Drums and Bullets

In shops and markets around Australia, you can find bullet headed cabbages (sometimes called rocket cabbages – ka-boom!) and tight wadded purple and green cabbages all year around.

See if you can find a drum cabbage – they are the vast, solid, thumping great heads like a drum.

In the cooler months, look out for cabbage royalty, the Savoy cabbage with its ruffled leaves. This one is a super-star in French cooking, where cooks and chefs stuff it with pork and breadcrumbs and all sorts of wonderful things.

The recipe is loads of hands-on fun and easier than you would think. It’s 100% totally awesomely impressive.

Growing Tips

We hate to break it to you, but growing cabbages means vigilance and high security. Are you ready for it?
Cabbage moth, that sweet little white moth that flutters innocently lays eggs that hatch into green caterpillars. They eat holes in the leaves.

Security is the answer! Simply put a fine net over your cabbage patch and peg it down around the sides. The net prevents young Ms. Cabbage Moth from laying her eggs.
No eggs, no caterpillars, no holes.
The good news is that if you live in the cooler climate parts of Australia, cabbage moths hibernate for the winter. Get planting in autumn and she’ll be right.

Colour Shifter

In a glass bowl or jug, soak about a quarter of a chopped purple cabbage in a litre of boiling water (adult hands here please!) Leave until it is cool.

When it is cold, use a strainer over a bowl to separate the cold floppy cabbage from the bright purple water. Admire – what a great colour. Put the cabbage in the compost and keep the purple water.

Now the wizard wheeze! Take some small clear juice glasses or jars. In each glass put a tablespoon of something acidic or alkaline. Pour a bit of purple cabbage water into each glass. What happens?

• Acids: lemon juice, vinegar, fruit juice, tartaric acid.
• Alkaline: bicarbonate of soda, a crushed stomach anti-acid tablet.

Science Stuff

Purple cabbage is pH sensitive. This means it reacts to acid and alkaline substances. The colour changes as the unstable natural chemicals in the purple cabbage water react with the acid or alkaline substance. Acids go pink and red, neutrals stay in the blue-purple range and alkalines are green to yellow. Try testing several kitchen items.

Check out our delicious recipes using cabbage